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Interesting article from China Daily on power stations

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2012-10/10/content_15805477.htm

Power stations fuel solar industry's growing international ambitions

Energy programs are among 15 international economic projects that have been given the go-ahead in a major effort to boost the country's global presence in the solar sector and provide more opportunities for Chinese companies.

The National Development and Reform Commission, China's top economic planner, announced the approval of 15 overseas projects on Monday. Energy projects account for about half. Silicon cell producers Hareon Solar Technology won approval to build a 122-megawatt solar-panel power station in Romania.

Winsun New Energy also won approval to establish solar power stations in Italy and Greece.

Solar panel manufacturers have been hit by trade friction recently but power stations may meet less opposition as they provide local employment, experts said.

Han Wenke, director of the Energy Research Institute under the NDRC, said Chinese companies are increasingly looking at setting up power stations.

"Solar has led a new wave in China's overseas investment," Han said.

Solar companies have the expertise to meet robust demand from overseas, he said.

The European Commission launched a probe into China's alleged dumping of solar products in September and the ProSun coalition, a group of 25 European solar panel manufacturers, requested tariffs of up to 120 percent on some Chinese solar products.

More than half of China's solar products are exported to Europe and the suggested tariff would seriously damage the domestic industry.

The EU's probe came on the heels of the US Commerce Department announcing preliminary tariffs of up to 250 percent on imports of Chinese solar cells in May.

The silicon wafer business has been affected by the gloomy global market and trade barriers in the US and Europe, said Xue Jin, assistant general manager of Winsun New Energy.

"Our company used to focus on silicon wafer manufacturing, but since last year we looked more at solar power stations," Xue said.

Winsun will start building a 115.9 megawatt solar power station this year in Italy, and increase investment into its branch in Luxembourg, after the NDRC approval.

Earlier this year, the NDRC gave approval to Long Energy, a solar company in Zhangjiagang, Jiangsu province, to invest in a solar power station in the US.

China Everbright International announced it was involved in a solar-panel energy project last year in Germany with an investment of about 7.6 million euros ($9.8 million). The station is connected to the power grid and has started generating power.

Zhang Jianping, a researcher from the Institute for International Economic Research under the NDRC, said investing in overseas solar power stations has gradually become a new business model.

Exports of solar products have been hit by anti-dumping and anti-subsidy investigations, but power stations help create local jobs, Zhang said.

The eurozone crisis provides an excellent opportunity.

However, not all solar companies are optimistic about global operations.

Tony Zhu, sales director of Shandong-based Himin Clean Energy, said the company has no short-term plans for projects in Europe and the US.

"It usually takes eight to 10 years to get back investment and the company may have a liquidity crunch. It costs about 15 yuan ($2.4) per watt to build such a station," Zhu said.

The NDRC also approved Guangdong Guangken Rubber Group investing in a 40,000-hectare site in Malaysia and Hangzhou Zhongce Rubber investing in a manufacturing project in Thailand.

Tires are a focus of trade friction. The US imposed 35 percent additional duties on Chinese tire imports in 2009.

"China imports rubber from Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia and it's a better option to also produce there to avoid trade friction," said Zhang.

Contact the writers at lanlan@chinadaily.com.cn and xieyu@chinadaily.com.cn

(China Daily 10/10/2012 page1)

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The excel file contains the figures for last month and the quarter. Average 25% drop in revenue from Q2. This will be the outcome for the Chinese companies in this Q.

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There must be some significance to PV. A world trade war has started in the fight to secure a piece of its future. Contestants: US, EU, China, India.

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Not too bad, almost all neutralized. Let's Taiwanese and Koreans make some money (or should I say Malaysians) . I am certain within 3 to 4 months based on the EU cases, companies will be setting up shops in global locations. There are enough poor countries in global economy. India just perfect. Little to nothing of own manufacturing. Funny they have First Solar caught there dumping as well.

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Not bad at all, for Trina effective tariff is 23.75, well below the preliminary one. They haven't added panels, I think that was market feared, in recent days. And I guess the tariffs are not retroactive, right? Or is it only for STP? ...."Regarding today’s decision, E.L “Mick” McDaniel, managing director of Suntech America, told PV-Tech that, “We are pleased with the DoC’s final decision to remove the 90-day retroactivity of tariffs on Suntech products. It was apparent to everyone within the solar industry that abnormal market demand in Q4 2011 was driven by the expiry of the 1603 cash grant program and this ruling reflects the reality that Suntech did not stockpile products to avoid potential tariffs.”....

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they have been already collected in the preliminary amounts. Some may get money back like Trina and Yingli, I think.

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Actually, the tariffs are all retroactive except for STP, that's odd decision. ..."Commerce found that critical circumstances exist in the AD investigation for all companies except Wuxi Suntech. As a result, provisional duty deposits – normally collected as of the date of publication in the Federal Register (May 25, 2012) of Commerce’s preliminary determinations – will be collected 90 days prior to that date from all companies except Wuxi Suntech. AD deposits applied to Wuxi Suntech will be due as of the date of publication of Commerce’s preliminary determination."... http://www.pv-magazine.com/news/details/beitrag/us-commerce-votes-in-favor-of-duties-for-chinese-pv-manufacturers_100008801/#axzz28iaozJU1

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Interesting article. It quite logical that the equipment manufacturers are the ones desperate for orders now and extending credits. LDK has 1 billion in payables. Someone is depending on the survival of LDK. On your dumping article; frankly the root cause of the PV glut is because US and Europe "dumped" manufacturing equipment and polysilicon on the industry. China stepped up and gave US and Europe cash for their overproduced manufacturing equipment and polysilicon. Now they are hanged because they used that equipment and raw material to produce cells and selling it at market prices. The source of the glut is clearly the high tech part of the value-chain produced in Europe and US. Ok, China could have avoided to do them "a solid" and not taken their stuff in exchange for cash. Yes, the industry credit from Chinese banks were directly channelled as cash revenue to US and European companies, with their Chinese customers left with the liabilities and manufacturing equipment. Chinese banks have been the main direct revenue driver for US and European PV companies. The whole thing is a farce. It would be a different story if China were not a net importer of manufacturing equipment and polysilicon. Solyndra et al are not the tech companies that sit on the key to PV production that are strategically important to protect. It's the GTAT, AMAT, Centrotherm and Roth & Rau. Chinese PV companies and their banks have been the biggest supporters of these strategically important European and US companies from a PV technology ownership and self-sufficiency perspective. Now US and Europe want to kill their best customer of advanced equipment (the stuff we want to do here, right?) and best supplier of simple equipment (the stuff we should want done over there, right?) with one stone. Not exactly a display of great strategic leadership.

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